Press Release


For Immediate Release Contact

 

Sue Ducat
Director of Communications
(301) 841-9962
sducat@projecthope.org

   

From Health Affairs:

 

First-Ever Quantitative Data About The Toll Of BPA Exposure

 

Bethesda, MD -- The risks of exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) have been well-known for some time. While exposure to BPA in the United States affects an estimated 92.6 percent of Americans over the age of five, there are gaps in the knowledge of the health consequences of BPA exposure. A new study, being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, presents the first estimate of the potential disease burden and costs associated with ongoing exposure to BPA. It found that $2.98 billion in annual costs are attributable to BPA-associated childhood obesity and adult coronary heart disease. Of the $2.98 billion, the study identified $1.49 billion in childhood obesity costs, the first environmentally attributable costs of child obesity to be documented.

 

Further Limiting Bisphenol A In Food Uses Could Provide Health And Economic Benefits

 

By Leonardo Trasande

 

http://content.healthaffairs.org/lookup/doi/10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0686

 

Trasande holds faculty appointments at New York University's School of Medicine, Wagner School of Public Service, and Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development.

 

The study modeled the potential health and economic benefits associated with replacing BPA in all food uses by quantifying childhood obesity and adult coronary heart disease attributable to BPA exposure in the United States in the year 2008. The data used were from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2003-2008 as well as other sources. Its analysis methodology followed the approach developed by the Institute of Medicine in assessing the "fractional contribution" of the environment to the causation of illness in the United States. "This analysis suggests that regulatory action to reduce BPA exposure could produce net benefits to society," concludes the author. "From an economic perspective, it might make sense for the Food and Drug Administration to require that an additive free of obesogenic and cardiovascular risks be substituted for BPA. However, premarket testing of potential substitutes is needed to prevent the use of another synthetic chemical instead of BPA that may lead to the same or worse health consequences."

 
About Health Affairs
 

Health Affairs is the leading journal at the intersection of health, health care, and policy. Published by Project HOPE, the peer-reviewed journal appears each month in print, with additional Web First papers published periodically at www.healthaffairs.org. The full text of each Health Affairs Web First paper is available free of charge to all website visitors for a one-week period following posting, after which it switches to pay-per-view for nonsubscribers. Web First papers are supported in part by a grant from The Commonwealth Fund. You can also find the journal on Facebook and Twitter. Read daily perspectives on Health Affairs Blog. Download our podcasts, including monthly Narrative Matters essays, on iTunes. Tap into Health Affairs content with the new iPad app.